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Trolling bad for celebs’ mental health — Beverly Afaglo

For many outside the world of fame, celebrities should have tough skin to handle both positive and negative criticisms since they are public figures, and should not take opinions personally, especially the unsavoury ones.

For many outside the world of fame, celebrities should have tough skin to handle both positive and negative criticisms since they are public figures, and should not take opinions personally, especially the unsavoury ones.

That is probably the conviction of internet trolls who have made it their ‘official’ assignment to be on the case of public figures on social media most of the time.

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But while trolls seem to enjoy the attention that comes with deliberately provoking popular persons on social media, actress Beverly Afaglo is asking such people to take into consideration the mental health of celebrities.

In a chat with the Daily Graphic, the Agency actress, who has had her fair share of the “poisonous bites” of trollers, said it was a sorry situation that people cared less about the feelings of celebs.

“Celebrities are not demigods. We are also flesh and blood, just like every other person, and the negative things people say to us, in the name of trolling, badly affects us. Some people say it comes with being a celebrity or the job so just as you enjoy the positive side, accept or live with the negatives too, but it’s not that easy because we are humans.

“Sometimes, I sincerely want to know why these people, who sit behind their computers or use their phones, feel when they insult or make derogatory remarks about others on social media. I always say that should the tables turn and they find themselves in our shoes, will they be able to take what they throw at us?” she said.

What is troll?

The term ‘troll’ is an online slang referring to someone who maliciously harasses, attacks or cyberbullies others. They might take your words out of context, spam you with offensive content or even engage in racist, homophobic, misogynistic, or otherwise hateful rhetoric.

But while many of such faultfinders defend themselves under the pretext of constructive criticisms, Beverly says there is a difference between constructive criticism and trolling.

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